Capiz Views – Photo Gallery

A collection of captivating pictures of different places and churches in Capiz Province and City of Roxas.

Sta Monica Parish Church, Panay Capiz

Sta Monica Parish Church, Panay Capiz. In 1566, Fray Martín de Rada is said to have preached the Gospel in Bamban (Pan-ay) and from there he proceeded to evangelize Dumangas to the south. The Augustinians continued to spread their net of evangelization to the south and west of Pan-ay until they had established footholds in the whole island. By the late 1500s, they had been had been the sole evangelizers of Panay island until the Jesuits arrived at this time.

Because of lack of food, Miguel Lopez de Legazpi transferred the Spanish settlement from Cebu to Pan-ay in 1569. The town was formally founded in 1572 (1581 according to Jorde), although by that time Legazpi had moved the capital of the Philippines, further north, to Manila. Fr. Bartolome de Alcantara was named the prior of the town with Fr. Agustin Camacho as assistant. A prosperous town due to trade, Pan-ay became capital of Capiz for two centuries, until Capiz was named capital. The town name was eventually given to whole island. After 1607, Fr. Alonso de Méntrida, noted for his linguistic studies and Visayan dictionary became prior. In the 18th century, Pan-ay was famous for its textile industry which produced a cloth called suerte and exported to Europe. In the 19th century, Don Antonio Roxas, grandfather of Pres. Manuel Roxas, opened one of the largest rum and wine distilleries in the town. The Augustinians held the parish until 1898, when administration tranferred to the seculars.

 

 

Dakong Lingganay

Dakong Lingganay

The first church was built before 1698 when it is reported that a typhoon had ruined it. In 1774, Fr. Miguel Murguía rebuilt the church, but it was later damaged by a typhoon on 15 January 1875. Fr. Jose Beloso restored the church in 1884. The church is best known for its 10.4 ton bell popularly called dakong lingganay (big bell). The bell was cast by Don Juan Reina who settled in Iloilo in 1868. Reina who was town dentist was also noted as a metal caster and smith. The bell was cast at Pan-ay from 70 sacks of coins donated by the townspeople. The bell was completed in 1878. It bears an inspiring inscription which translated reads: “I am God’s voice which shall echo praise from one end of the town of Pan-ay to the other, so that Christ’s faithful followers may enter this house of God to receive heavenly graces.”

 

 

 

Panoramic View of Olotayan Island and Roxas City

Panoramic View of Olotayan Island and Roxas City

Roxas City Hortus Botanicus - Brgy. Milibili, Roxas City

Roxas City Hortus Botanicus - Brgy. Milibili, Roxas Capiz State University - Pontevedra Campus (formerly PSPC)Parish of St. Isidore, Pontevedra Capiz

Brgy. Loctugan Parish Church, Roxas City

Brgy. Loctugan Parish Church, Roxas CityPanit-an Parish Church, Panitan, Capiz

Mambusao Parish Church, Mambusao, Capiz

Mambusao Parish Church, Mambusao, Capiz

Sta. Monica Church, Panay Capiz.. the church where the Biggest Bell in Asia hangs in its belfry

Sta. Monica Church, Panay Capiz.. the church where the Biggest Bell in Asia hangs in its belfry

 

Parish of St. Isidore, Pontevedra, Capiz

Parish of St. Isidore, Pontevedra, Capiz

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 Capiznon Online talks about everything and anything you want to know about Capiz and Roxas City, its allure, its beauty, the latest issues being talked about, the happenings as well as the latest landmarks, recreational centers, watering holes and all the things that make Capiz truly captivating and bewitching. This is a place where Hectic Capiznon Bloggers of 2009 can be found.

12 Comments

Filed under Captivating Capiz

12 responses to “Capiz Views – Photo Gallery

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  6. great entry – keep it up. I’ll put up a link to this post. 😀

  7. lorna

    My father was born in Mambusao Capiz. They are the Delfin family. I have live there for two years during the 60’s. I had been back twice in the 70’s. It is now almost thirty years that I have not seen the place. I live now in England when I came accross these images via google, I felt sad and homesick. I now dream of coming back and see for myself how much it has change. I wonder if it is still as beautiful as I remember.

  8. Net Atienza

    Hello there, Lorna. I can relate to your sentiments, to the t. My mom was born and raised in Sigma, Capiz, and my father, in Roxas City. Although I was born and raised in Quezon City, my father made sure that we spent the whole summer vacation in Roxas City. I have precious, precious memories of childhood there. Capiz is the only place, where my roots are found. I am now in Corona, California, and have been away for 43 years, but still yearning. I have googled new developments in Capiz, where a vacation house suites. If things fall in places, I am visiting in spring of 2010. My wishes that you’d be able to visit, someday.

    Regards,
    Net

    • Philip Loro

      Capiz has changed a lot. You should see it. Have a vacation there and enjoy the seafoods.

    • teresita a.luna

      hi lorna. i am teresita luna from davao city phil. i just got back from pontevedra capiz to visit my family . it is now an improved place and peaceful. i studied my 3rd yr.high school at pontevedra brgy high school, on may 12th will be our 40th yr.anniversary. now im back home but i plan to visit the place again.lets see and meet. i am now 57 yrs old. imagine i still love to visit my moms hometown.

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